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active ctyokines graphic

Active Cytokines

 

Introduction

Cytokines are small proteins that play a crucial role in cell signalling. They act as messengers between cells, regulating various immune responses, inflammation, and communication among cells of the immune system.

Produced by a wide range of cells, including immune cells (such as macrophages, lymphocytes, and dendritic cells), as well as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and others, cytokines regulate and coordinate immune responses, inflammation, and various physiological functions.

Cytokines function by binding to specific receptors on target cells, transmitting signals that can lead to changes in gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and cell death. They help regulate the intensity and duration of immune responses, playing roles in both innate and adaptive immunity.

Some examples of cytokines include interleukins, interferons, tumour necrosis factors (TNFs), chemokines, and growth factors. Each type of cytokine has distinct functions and plays a critical role in maintaining normal physiological processes and responding to different challenges faced by the body, such as infections or tissue damage.

cytokines pathway diagram

Why are Active Cytokines so important in research?

  1. Understanding Immune Responses: They play a pivotal role in regulating immune responses, so studying active cytokines helps in understanding how the immune system functions. This is crucial for research related to autoimmune diseases, allergies, infections, and immune system disorders.
  2. Drug Development: Many drugs are designed to target cytokines or their receptors to modulate immune responses. Researching active cytokines provides insights into potential drug targets for conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and certain cancers.
  3. Inflammation and Disease: Active cytokines are heavily involved in initiating and regulating inflammation. Researching them helps in understanding the role of inflammation in various diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and chronic inflammatory conditions.
  4. Biomarkers: Certain cytokines serve as biomarkers for specific diseases or conditions. Researchers use them to diagnose diseases, monitor disease progression, and assess responses to treatments.
  5. Therapeutic Approaches: Cytokine therapies involve using cytokines or cytokine antagonists to treat diseases. Research on active cytokines contributes to developing and improving such therapeutic approaches.
  6. Immune System Modulation: Understanding active cytokines allows researchers to modulate immune responses for therapeutic purposes, such as enhancing immune responses against cancer or suppressing excessive immune reactions in autoimmune diseases.

In essence, active cytokines are central to many areas of biomedical research, including immunology, pharmacology, and disease pathology. Their study helps unravel the intricate mechanisms governing immune responses and aids in the development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting various diseases and conditions.

Got a question about active cytokines?  Please get in touch.

How to find the right Active Cytokine for you

Finding the "perfect" active cytokine involves considering several factors based on specific research or therapeutic goals. Here's a guide on how to identify or select active cytokines for your intended purposes:

  • Research Objective or Therapeutic Goal: Determine the purpose for which you need the cytokine. Are you studying a particular immune response, inflammation, cell differentiation, or signalling pathways?
  • Biological Activity: Confirm that the cytokine is biologically active and exhibits the desired effects relevant to your study or application. Check for evidence supporting its functionality in relevant assays or experimental models.
  • Purity: Ensure the cytokine is of high purity and quality. A purity level of 95% or greater might be recommended to avoid unwanted effects from impurities that could influence cellular responses.
  • Endotoxin levels: In cell culture experiments or in vitro assays, endotoxin levels are typically required to be very low to avoid unintended immune activation or interference with cellular responses. Levels of endotoxin should ideally be below 1.0 EU/μg or even lower, depending on the sensitivity of the cell types or assays being used.
  • Concentration: Determine the required concentration or dosage for your experiments or intended use. Some applications may require specific concentrations or doses of the cytokine to achieve desired effects.

Product List

At Biorbyt, we present an extensive selection of active cytokines, guaranteeing exceptional purity, bioactivity, and quality consistency throughout each batch.

Interleukins (ILs)

Catalog #

Name

Catalog #

Name

orb867311

IL-1 alpha

orb1087555

IL-2

orb257601

IL-6

orb257598

IL-4

orb419321

IL-12 alpha

orb358978

IL-13

Growth Factors

Catalog #

Name

Catalog #

Name

orb257923

VEGF165

orb1146986

IGF-I

orb257918

VEGF121

orb257996

TGF-beta 1

orb762429

EGF

orb1496221

VEGF110

Tumour Necrosis Factors (TNFs)

Catalog #

Name

Catalog #

Name

orb257883

TNF-alpha

orb359191

TNFSF9

orb705344

TNFSF14

orb594873

CD40 Ligand

orb1149290

TNFSF11

orb1733281

TNF-beta

Chemokines

Catalog #

Name

Catalog #

Name

orb594818

CXCL8

orb359066

CCL2

orb359056

CXCL10

orb359071

CCL5

orb1818955

CXCL14

orb1496251

CXCL13

Interferons

Catalog #

Name

Catalog #

Name

orb735041

IFN-alpha 1

orb257562

IFN-gamma

orb867302

IFN-alpha / beta R1

orb594801

IFN-lambda 3

orb359211

IFN-alpha 2

orb359216

IFN-omega 1